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Table 10: Race and Immigrant Status of Renters by Sub-tenure


Householder All Rental Units Controlled Stabilized Other Regulated Unregulated Public Housing In Rem
White 776,520 46,578 440,402 38,481 237,706 12,589 1,288
39.9% 66.0% 43.4% 30.3% 43.6% 7.6% 5.6%
Black 500,164 9,527 203,965 52,832 132,483 88,124 13,059
25.7% 13.5% 20.1% 41.6% 24.3% 53.2% 56.8%
Puerto Rican 272,463 7,269 171,493 11,049 65,424 14,577 3,265
14.0% 10.3% 16.9% 8.7% 12.0% 8.8% 14.2%
Non Puerto Rican Hispanic 253,001 5,575 123,800 19,050 52,884 46,216 5,334
13.0% 7.9% 12.2% 15.0% 9.7% 27.9% 23.2%
Asian 132,339 1,270 70,018 4,953 53,429 2,485 23
6.8% 1.8% 6.9% 3.9% 9.8% 1.5% 0.1%
Other 11,677 353 5,074 635 3,271 1,491 69
0.6% 0.5% 0.5% 0.5% 0.6% 0.9% 0.3%
Total* 1,946,165 70,572 1,014,751 127,001 545,198 165,647 22,992
100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Immigrants** 933,292 24,912 535,789 48,514 258,969 56,486 8,622
47.7 35.3 52.8 38.2 47.5 34.1 37.5


* Universe: All Occupied Units

** A household is defined to be an immigrant household if the householder was foreign born and both of his or her parents were foreign born.

From: Housing Conditions and Problems In New York City: An Analysis of the 1996 Housing and Vacancy Survey by Michael H. Schill and Benjamin P. Scafidi

Source: 1996 New York City Housing and Vacancy Survey Data File, U.S. Bureau of the Census

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